MAKING INJERA

MAKING INJERA

Every day, several cooks at Project Mercy spend the majority of their morning cooking and piling Injera high in baskets to be served to the 72 kids that live on the Project Mercy children’s home campus. The semi-outdoor kitchen has no electricity so all the work is done by rays of sunlight that pierce through the small windows and dimly light the room. Smoke from the wood-fire skillets fills the air, so much so that at times your eyes begin to burn.

Every day, several cooks at Project Mercy spend the majority of their morning cooking and piling Injera high in baskets to be served to the 72 kids that live on the Project Mercy children’s home campus. The semi-outdoor kitchen has no electricity so all the work is done by rays of sunlight that pierce through the small windows and dimly light the room. Smoke from the wood-fire skillets fills the air, so much so that at times your eyes begin to burn.

Injera is a staple in Ethiopian cuisine, but what is it? We spent a few hours in the smoky kitchen at Project Mercy Children’s Home to find out what Injera is and how it is made.

 

Injera is most easily compared to a fermented sourdough crepe. It is eaten as rice is eaten in many countries, with small sides, lentils, and stews piled on top and enjoyed together.

Injera is a staple in Ethiopian cuisine, but what is it? We spent a few hours in the smoky kitchen at Project Mercy Children’s Home to find out what Injera is and how it is made.

 

Injera is most easily compared to a fermented sourdough crepe. It is eaten as rice is eaten in many countries, with small sides, lentils, and stews piled on top and enjoyed together.

Injera is simply teff flower and water.The actual process of making injera takes three to five days, as it must undergo fermentation. Once fermented, the teff mixture must be boiled down to a thicker batter like consistency.

 

Once this is finished, it is now time to light the fire, heat the skillets and start cooking. Watch the video to see the rest.

MAKING INJERA

Every day, several cooks at Project Mercy spend the majority of their morning cooking and piling Injera high in baskets to be served to the 72 kids that live on the Project Mercy children’s home campus. The semi-outdoor kitchen has no electricity so all the work is done by rays of sunlight that pierce through the small windows and dimly light the room. Smoke from the wood-fire skillets fills the air, so much so that at times your eyes begin to burn.

MAKING INJERA

Every day, several cooks at Project Mercy spend the majority of their morning cooking and piling Injera high in baskets to be served to the 72 kids that live on the Project Mercy children’s home campus. The semi-outdoor kitchen has no electricity so all the work is done by rays of sunlight that pierce through the small windows and dimly light the room. Smoke from the wood-fire skillets fills the air, so much so that at times your eyes begin to burn.

In a dimly lit room, a woman scoops up freshly cook Injera off of a hot cast iron skillet with a straw tray.

Injera is simply teff flower and water.The actual process of making injera takes three to five days, as it must undergo fermentation. Once fermented, the teff mixture must be boiled down to a thicker batter like consistency.

 

Once this is finished, it is now time to light the fire, heat the skillets and start cooking. Watch the video to see the rest.

Injera is a staple in Ethiopian cuisine, but what is it? We spent a few hours in the smoky kitchen at Project Mercy Children’s Home to find out what Injera is and how it is made.

 

Injera is most easily compared to a fermented sourdough crepe. It is eaten as rice is eaten in many countries, with small sides, lentils, and stews piled on top and enjoyed together.

Injera is a staple in Ethiopian cuisine, but what is it? We spent a few hours in the smoky kitchen at Project Mercy Children’s Home to find out what Injera is and how it is made.

 

Injera is most easily compared to a fermented sourdough crepe. It is eaten as rice is eaten in many countries, with small sides, lentils, and stews piled on top and enjoyed together.

Injera is simply teff flower and water.The actual process of making injera takes three to five days, as it must undergo fermentation. Once fermented, the teff mixture must be boiled down to a thicker batter like consistency.

 

Once this is finished, it is now time to light the fire, heat the skillets and start cooking. Watch the video to see the rest.

want to help feed more kids injera?

want to help feed more kids injera?